25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

In a perfect world. ::sigh:: BF_STATIC.timequeue.push(function () { if (BF_STATIC.bf_test_mode) localStorage.setItem(‘posted_date’, 1409529043); }); BF_STATIC.timequeue.push(function () { document.getElementById(“update_posted_time_3433685”).innerHTML = “posted on ” + UI.dateFormat.get_formatted_date(1409529043); });

1. Aaron Samuels, Mean Girls

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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SNL Studios / Via perezhilton.com

He was the sweet and smart popular boy with a girlfriend. Sorry to say that yours didn’t fall for you and break up with the equally hot Queen Bee.

2. Austin Ames, A Cinderella Story

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Warner Bros. / Via pinterest.com

He was the super pretty BMOC who was actually quite nice. Only, your Austin didn’t waltz with you in a gazebo and kiss you in the rain. If only.

3. Cameron James, 10 Things I Hate About You

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Touchstone Pictures / Via zimbio.com

He was the all-American boy who liked the Queen. You hoped he was secretly crushing on you instead and would take you to prom, but nope.

4. Cliff Pantone, Bring It On

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Beacon Pictures / Via wifflegif.com

He was your best friend’s hot older brother. But you probably weren’t a cheerleader and you two definitely didn’t share that amazing bathroom moment.

5. Cory Matthews, Boy Meets World

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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ABC / Disney / Via wifflegif.com

He was your awkward childhood crush who played by the rules. Though your Cory failed to go all the way to Disney World to win you back.

6. Dan Humphrey, Gossip Girl

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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The CW / Via fanpop.com

He was the cute nerd that seemed to like you a lot. But, sadly for you, he was actually in love with your school’s Queen and they ended up dating.

7. Duke, She’s The Man

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Lakeshore Entertainment / Via gifwave.com

He was sweet, funny, hot and your best guy friend. But, instead of ending up with him while in a gorgeous gown, he ended up with the girl he always liked.

8. Han Solo,The Star Wars Series

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Lucasfilm / Via pinterest.com

He was the older rebel you had major hots for. Yes, both were probably self-centered and super cute, but yours didn’t stop his player life for you.

9. Jack Dawson, Titanic

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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20th Century Fox / Via imgfave.com

He was the fun and crazy boy you met during summer who you had serious hots for. Only he didn’t teach you how to fly and do the Irish Jig.

10. Jake Ryan, Sixteen Candles

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Universal Pictures / Via weheartit.com

He was the gorgeous older guy you had a major crush on. But, in real life, he didn’t show up in front of the church and kiss you on your birthday.

11. Jess Mariano, Gilmore Girls

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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The WB / The CW / Via weheartit.com

He was your neighborhood bad-boy whose smile was your kryptonite. But your Jess didn’t fight to be with you for a year and then treat you perfectly.

12. Jim Halpert, The Office

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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NBC / Via gifmambo.com

He was your smart and sweet friend with a great sense of humor. But, actually, he wasn’t in love with you for three years and didn’t propose in the rain.

13. Josh, Clueless

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Paramount Pictures / Via onscreenkisses.tumblr.com

He was your cute family friend who you pretended to hate. You waited for him to join you on the steps and kiss you, but he never did. Apologies.

14. Landon Carter, A Walk To Remember

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Gaylord Films / Via weheartit.com

He was the mean and selfish king of the school, who you always liked. But unfortunately, your Landon didn’t become good to be with you.

15. Marty McFly, The Back To The Future Series

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Amblin Entertainment / Via rebloggy.com

He was the smart-mouth who knew how to change your mind. But you didn’t get to travel around in a time machine with him and Doc.

16. Matt Flamhaff, 13 Going On 30

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Revolution Studios / Via lifeisadreamposts.tumblr.com

He was your sweet and geeky close friend. You hoped one day he would look like Mark Ruffalo, but he never did, and he ended up with someone else.

17. Noah Calhoun, The Notebook

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Avery Pix / New Line Cinema / Via thenotebookgifs.tumblr.com

He was your first crush who got hot over the summer. Sure, both were smart and in love, but yours probably wasn’t with you. It sucks, I know.

18. Patrick Verona, 10 Things I Hate About You

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Touch Stone Pictures / Via gurl.com

He was the badass with a temper that everybody was scared of. Only, in your case, he didn’t serenade you during soccer practice or buy you a guitar.

19. Ron Weasley, The Harry Potter Series

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Warner Bros. / Via fyeahclaymatthews.tumblr.com

He was your close, kind and loyal friend who you always liked. Through yours wasn’t secretly in love with you too. Sorry about that.

20. Ross Geller, Friends

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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NBC / Via fanpop.com

He was your childhood friend who grew up and came back to you. Only, in truth, he didn’t run to the airport and declare his love to keep you from moving.

21. Seth Cohen, The O.C.

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Fox / Via thegifs-queen.tumblr.com

He was your super sarcastic, nerdy and adorable classmate. Only your boy didn’t declare his love while on a table in front of the whole student body.

22. Shawn Hunter, Boy Meets World

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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ABC / Disney / Via pinterest.com

He was the badass with a sensitive side and great hair. But did he stay with you for years and secretly write love poems about you? Didn’t think so.

23. Troy Bolton, High School Musical

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Disney / Via wulffpost.com

He was the jock who was friends with someone in every clique. But, he wasn’t secretly a singer who expressed his feelings for you through song.

24. Tyler Gage, Step Up

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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Summit Entertainment / Via gifboom.com

He was the hot guy who always got detention and had a bad background. Sadly, the one at your school wasn’t a secretly amazing dancer who fell for you.

25. Zack Morris, Saved By The Bell

25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed

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NBC / Via giphy.com

He was the trouble maker who you knew had a sweet side. Only he didn’t make you a Prom picnic and end up being your husband, which really sucks.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/hp8spicychicken/25-characters-who-prove-we-were-mislead-about-boys-qd27

The post 25 Swoon-Worthy Hunks You Wish Actually Existed appeared first on How To Buy Franchises.

Debating The Ending Of “Edge Of Tomorrow”

Are audiences too hooked on Hollywood movies that explain everything? A BuzzFeed Entertainment discussion! (MAJOR SPOILERS ahead!)

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Emily Blunt and Tom Cruise in Edge of Tomorrow. Warner Bros. Pictures

Adam B. Vary: It’s no secret that we both enjoyed Edge of Tomorrow, Alison, but we’ve gathered here today to discuss a part of the movie that we disagree about: the film’s ending. So, obviously, the rest of this conversation is going to be riddled with MAJOR SPOILERS about Edge of Tomorrow – and a few other major Hollywood films as well.

As you astutely observed in your review, Edge of Tomorrow uses video game logic – if I mess up and die, I just re-spawn at my save point and keep grinding ahead until I succeed – as a surprisingly witty engine for its storytelling, and a resonant metaphor for the exhaustion of war. That progress builds and builds as Tom Cruise’s Cage and Emily Blunt’s Rita get closer and closer to their goal of reaching the central “brain” of the alien Mimics that have conquered the entire European continent. Cage and Rita desperately need to kill that brain, because it allows the aliens to reset the day when they die and learn from their mistakes, a power Cage unwittingly hijacks in the opening 20 minutes of the film. Before they get to their goal, however, Cage loses that power, and when he and Rita finally make it to the alien brain buried within the Louvre, they both die in their successful attempt to destroy it. As Cage’s life drifts from him, however, tendrils of alien brain goo enter his body, and ZAP, he’s suddenly sent back to the very beginning of the film, before he was shanghaied into being a grunt in the war – and, more to the point, well before he and Rita actually ever meet.

I loved this ending, but before I staunchly defend it, I would love to hear more about your reaction to it.

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David James / Warner Bros. Pictures

Alison Willmore: I didn’t hate the ending, but it did seem pretty hand wave-y – “And now the story’s finished, so… have something happy!” This being a big-budget Tom Cruise action movie, I didn’t expect it to conclude with our heroes both getting killed, the world never to know the valiant efforts of the man and woman who died taking down the alien force that threatened to exterminate mankind. So it didn’t come as a surprise to me that the film volleyed Cage back in time to the beginning, where he’s also conveniently poised to look up Rita (who, thanks to the time-looping shenanigans, has no idea who he is).

My main complaint with what happens at the end is that it seemed like a convenient betrayal of the logic by which the rest of the movie operated – why, if Cage has been sent back in time using the power of alien goo, do the rest of the aliens stay blown up? If he’s returned, much wiser, to the start of the film, before he, Rita, and J-Squad ever set out on the mission to the Louvre, then shouldn’t the aliens also still have their firm stronghold on most of Europe? He’d have the knowledge to destroy them, sure – as an officer, he could probably even arrange to have a squad of soldiers sent there to do it for him, after coming up with the right cover story to avoid getting labeled mentally unwell and hospitalized. (For a military force desperately trying to save the world from malicious extraterrestrials and apparently happy to throw a dude with no training out into a major battle, the United Defense Force seems a little oversensitive about mental health judgments.)

Adam, did that not strike you as some shameless screenplay magic on the part of writers Christopher McQuarrie, Jez Butterworth, and John-Henry Butterworth? Or do you have another read on what happened?

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Noah Taylor, Emily Blunt, and Tom Cruise in Edge of Tomorrow. Warner Bros. Pictures

ABV: Oh, it was totally shameless, and I loved it. If I’m forced to parse the storytelling logic here – this is going to get really geeky for a second – I would venture that the alien’s ability to reset the day meant that a part of the alien consciousness was still rooted in their previous “save point.” So when Cage and Rita destroyed the alien brain, the entire world jumped back to the alien’s last save point, which just happened to fall around the beginning of the film. (Cage’s save point, by contrast, was the last time he’d lost consciousness, i.e., when he was knocked out and shipped to the front lines.) And at the very moment both the alien brain and Cage were dying, the alien’s time-travel goo fused with Cage, and he jumped back in time with the rest of the alien horde. But since Cage wasn’t of the horde, he survived the jump, and lived to see a better world – one where he isn’t a coward, where the world is safe, and where Rita is alive.

Make sense? Doesn’t matter! Because what I really loved about this ending was how it fulfilled the elemental human fantasy baked into its video game/Groundhog Day premise – if you had the chance to redo your life enough times, you can reach a perfect outcome – with a refreshing minimum of exposition.

Ugh, exposition! So many movies now are hopelessly, helplessly clogged with it. The Amazing Spider-Man 2 – blood and genetics and eels and daddy issues and subway stations and military healing machines-cum-hoverboards! Godzilla – MUTOs and nature and mating rituals and echolocation and Nevada and JUST LET THEM FIGHT ALREADY! Haven’t you felt that for the last 10 years, Hollywood’s most common storytelling gear has been to tell, not show, to lard up the screen with huge action sequences bracketed by scenes that explain every convoluted detail of what is about to happen in those huge action sequences?

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“Hey, it’s your friendly, neighborhood Spider-Man being carried away by all his plot developments!” Niko Tavernise / Columbia Pictures

AW: Oh, absolutely. And adding to that are the growing obligations toward franchise-building and seeding cinematic universes – not only do films have to spend so much time explaining their own, often elaborate premises, they have to introduce elements that have nothing to do with the story at hand in order to set up sequels and spin-offs. Meet this new guy! He’s not important now, but we’re considering giving him a movie of his own! Hollywood’s also gotten so reboot-happy that, like Cage in Edge of Tomorrow, we keep getting dumped back at the most explain-y part of any story – its origins.

I’d say that what makes Edge of Tomorrow so enjoyable isn’t just the way it’s so economic about its obligatory info dumps, it’s that the movie also trusts the audience to pick up on certain details or nuances without having to spell them out. There’s definitely a Starship Troopers-esque sharpness to its depiction of the military, from the glibness of Cruise’s character (a former ad exec) initially managing the public image of the war while getting nowhere near it himself to the idea of the suits as a means to lure fresh civilians into combat – barely any training required! But, thank god, no character ever makes a speech about how or she is just a cog in the machine of war, fighting on behalf of people who never get their hands dirty, etc., etc.

ABV: Even better, there is just the one scene where the alien’s power is explained – complete with a visual aid – and then the movie charges ahead into the rest of its story. There is no made-up “science” about how the aliens work (like that ridiculous hypothetical explanation I gave earlier), or lengthy walk-through of how those cool exo-suits work. The sequence where Cage and Rita keep grinding through a workable path through the battlefield was all action, no explanation – the audience is trusted to care about what matters, i.e., the characters. ‘Twas glorious.

Warner Bros. Pictures / Via inceptionmovie.tumblr.com

Warner Bros. Pictures / Via inceptionmovie.tumblr.com

 

You’ve been Inception’d.

AW: Many of my favorite genre movies of the last few years, like Looper and Chronicle, have been ones that introduced their concept and then let it be explored by way of its characters and action, rather than by someone letting loose with a slew of exposition. But sometimes I wonder if I’m in the minority there. Proof of fandom’s love of detail can be found in the countless wikis and theories and frame-by-frame analyses online, in obsessing over costumes and spaceship designs and hints at backstory. You and I may be a little exhausted by the exposition barrage Hollywood has tended toward, but is this just the industry giving people what they want?

ABV: Let’s call it Inception syndrome: the idea that a movie is only worthwhile if there are so many details that you really need to see it a second time to understand what the hell is going on.

AW: Exactly – and what was such a bummer, to me, about Inception, as breathtakingly cool as it looked, was that it spent so much time on explanation and prep, only to have a lot of that be rendered meaningless when the action actually started and things didn’t go as planned. Rather than be given the whole instruction manual off the bat, the audience could have been trusted to get the gist of a lot of it as the “heist” unfolded, and if some things were entirely clear, that’s fine too. But then I’m reminded of Prometheus, which got torn apart by the nitpicky crowd for not making the meaning of its various elements more clear. Do you think people have gotten less tolerant of that kind of ambiguity?

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Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Bruce Willis in Looper. Columbia Pictures

ABV: No, I think people are naturally less tolerant of bad storytelling, and since the characters in Prometheus were so blandly drawn (save for Michael Fassbender’s slinky android), the gaping holes in the plot were that much more exposed.

I mean, high-concept movies are by their very nature acts of high-wire storytelling. But to paraphrase Fassbender’s quotation of Lawrence of Arabia in Prometheus, the trick is not minding that the film has a high concept. Edge of Tomorrow – like Looper and Chronicle – works because we are engaged with the characters and their relationships within the film, which are subsequently challenged and strained by the film’s high concept. There are “internal logic” problems in all three of these films, but that doesn’t really matter, because these movies aren’t about their own internal logic – they are about how the audience connects with relationships between the characters, and the great “what if?” idea tucked within that high concept. (Looper: What if you could meet your younger self? Chronicle: What if you were suddenly a superhero, but also a teenage boy? Etc.)

I feel like a crazy person for even having to spell this out, by the way, but so many of Hollywood’s biggest movies seem to have abandoned this basic core concept of good storytelling.

AW: Sure, because concept and giant set-pieces have started to take precedent over characters. I loved the action sequences in Godzilla, but found the characters almost shockingly generic, despite the appeal of what was, for a blockbuster, a pretty quirky cast. Those characters weren’t people so much as functions of plot – Ken Watanabe and Sally Hawkins were there to deliver backstory, Elizabeth Olsen and Carson Bolde were there to be in peril, and Aaron Taylor-Johnson was around to conveniently be present at major monster crossings along the way.

ABV: And be pretty.

 

Michael Fassbender in Prometheus; Aaron Taylor-Johnson in Godzilla.

AW: I won’t argue with you on that. But it does seem like a function of the direction these giant movies have been taking – Taylor-Johnson’s not really the star of Godzilla, Godzilla is, and any follow-ups are always going to be centered on the monster, not the people in his way. And for the same reason, we rarely get the kind of neat, definitive ending Edge of Tomorrow offers, because it’s better business to leave the door open for future films.

ABV: It almost sounds like I’ve convinced you that Edge of Tomorrow’s ending is actually good, but I’ll press my luck by pursuing this final point: So many of our most celebrated and popular Hollywood summer blockbusters – from The Avengers and Avatar to Jaws and Star Wars – have endings that push the edge of storytelling logic. (Wait, how will Loki’s staff close the space-time hole over Manhattan? And could Chief Brody really shoot that obscured air tank with a soaked rifle while bobbing on the ocean? Etc.) But they are so deeply satisfying – Iron Man flying through the wormhole with the nuclear missile; Brody screaming with glee as he’s covered in giant shark guts – that we don’t mind the leap of logic.

I think maybe the issue people have with Edge of Tomorrow is that it feels like it should be over-plotted, but it isn’t, so people are focusing on the time-travel logic when they really should be focusing on that fabulous final shot of Tom Cruise beaming with pride and relief and excitement that he gets to explain to Rita how they both just saved the world, and each other. Maybe?

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David James / Warner Bros. Pictures

AW: Oh, I still think the end’s a bit of a cop-out, though I’ll agree the laugh Cruise lets out is great, after he walks up to Rita for what is, for her, their first meeting. I do feel that the issue’s ultimately not whether an ending feels unlikely in a larger storytelling sense but whether it feels unlikely in the context of the world the film’s established – and for me, the Edge of Tomorrow ending didn’t really fit with what had come before, though obviously your mileage may vary. Either way, I was happy to see such a satisfying, well-made blockbuster that didn’t end with the movie equivalent of an ellipsis, with an after-the-credits stinger teeing up the next installment. Sometimes, ongoing storytelling feels overrated, especially after watching a movie that tells such a cracking tale in two hours, hits its ending, and is done.

ABV: And with that: Next week on BuzzFeed… (Joking!)

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/adambvary/does-edge-of-tomorrow-have-a-bad-ending

The post Debating The Ending Of “Edge Of Tomorrow” appeared first on How To Buy Franchises.

14 Little Known Nuggets Of Australian History

r/australia took a break from politics to talk history. Gold was unearthed!

1. In the Thirties, Western Australia deployed soldiers to curb emus in a campaign dubbed The Emu War.

In the Thirties, Western Australia deployed soldiers to curb emus in a campaign dubbed The Emu War.

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funnyjunk.com

Major Meredith of the Royal Australian Artillery commanded soldiers armed with Lewis machine guns and 10,000 rounds of ammunition.

Major Meredith of the Royal Australian Artillery commanded soldiers armed with Lewis machine guns and 10,000 rounds of ammunition.

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worth1000.com

“The machine-gunners’ dreams of point blank fire into serried masses of Emus were soon dissipated. The Emu command had evidently ordered guerrilla tactics, and its unwieldy army soon split up into innumerable small units that made use of the military equipment uneconomic. A crestfallen field force therefore withdrew from the combat area after about a month.” Ornithologist Dominic Serventy via Wikipedia.

2. Rum was once legal tender.

Rum was once legal tender.

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rum.cz

The history of currency in Australia began in 1800, when Governor King issued a proclamation setting the value of coins in New South Wales. However, because of the shortage of money, the real currency during the first twenty-five years of settlement was rum. Source: Wikipedia.

3. Melbourne used to be called Batmania.

Melbourne used to be called Batmania.

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bristowe.com

Before being officially named, Melbourne had several interim names including Batmania, Bearbrass, Bareport, Bareheep and Barehurp. Source: Bill Wannan, Australian folklore: a dictionary of lore, legends and popular allusions.

4. Charles Darwin never saw a kangaroo.

Charles Darwin never saw a kangaroo.

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J.W. Lewin, Platypus / State Library of NSW / Via sl.nsw.gov.au

Bathurst marks the farthest point inland that Charles Darwin travelled to in 1836. He saw a platypus, but not once on his entire trip to Australia did he see a kangaroo. Observations of Australia’s unique fauna and flora, combined with considerations of the continent’s geographical isolation, contributed toward Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection. Source: australia.gov.au.

5. AFL was invented by a New South Welshman.

AFL was invented by a New South Welshman.

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sydney.edu.au

In 1856, Queanbeyan-born Wills returned to Australia after studying at Rugby School in England. The schoolboy game Wills had learned in England underwent modifications in Melbourne until a new code – Australian Rules – was born. “Wills also carried out perhaps the most astonishing act in Australian sporting history, captaining a team of Aboriginal cricketers from western Victoria, and led them on to the MCG on Boxing Day 1866 to the applause of some 10,000 spectators.”Source: The Man Who Invented AFL by Greg de Moore.

6. Tamworth was the first city in the Southern Hemisphere to have electric lights.

Tamworth was the first city in the Southern Hemisphere to have electric lights.

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T-Oh! & Matt / Creative Commons / Via Flickr: tracy77

Tamworth in inland NSW is known as the “First City of Lights”, being the first place in Australia to use electric street lights in 1888. Source: Sydney Morning Herald.

7. New Zealand was almost part of Australia.

New Zealand was almost part of Australia.

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Via wikimedia.org

The Federation of Australia was the process by which the separate British self-governing colonies of New South Wales, Victoria, Queensland, South Australia Tasmania and Western Australia formed one nation. New Zealand was originally part of this process, but decided not to join the federation. Source: Wikipedia.

8. Australia was the first nation to give women both voting rights and the right to sit in office.

Australia was the first nation to give women both voting rights and the right to sit in office.

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Via wikipedia.org

In 1902, the Commonwealth of Australia passed the Commonwealth Franchise Act, which enabled women to vote and stand for election for the Federal Parliament. Source: Electoral Milestones for Women – Australian Electoral Commission.

9. It was once illegal to ocean swim in daylight.

It was once illegal to ocean swim in daylight.

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State Library of NSW / Via sydneyforeveryone.com.au

In 1902 this law was openly defied by a male swimmer who entered the water at Manly Beach at midday. He was arrested but no charges were laid, and subsequently “surf bathing” became a popular pastime. With more swimmers in the surf, the dangers of the ocean became apparent, and in 1906 the first surf lifesaving club in the world was founded at Bondi Beach. Source: australia.gov.au.

10. Vegemite was known as Parwill from 1928 to 1935.

Vegemite was known as Parwill from 1928 to 1935.

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vegemite.com.au

Vegemite founder Fred Walker was determined to emulate the success of Marmite and the logic behind the re-branding strategy was simple: “If Marmite…then Parwill.” Source: Vegemite.

11. In World War II, the Australian Army was the first to defeat the Germans (Tobruk, 1941) and Japanese (Kokoda, 1942) in battle.

In World War II, the Australian Army was the first to defeat the Germans (Tobruk, 1941) and Japanese (Kokoda, 1942) in battle.

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kokoda.commemoration.gov.au

Sources: Tobruk and Kokoka.

12. Australia invented plastic banknotes.

Australia invented plastic banknotes.

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australianbanknotes.com.au

Modern polymer banknotes were first developed by the Reserve Bank of Australia (RBA), CSIRO and The University of Melbourne. They were first issued as currency in 1988 to coincide with Australia’s Bicentenary. Source: Wikipedia.

13. Until 2005, it was illegal in Victoria to be a fortune teller, tarot card reader or witch.

Until 2005, it was illegal in Victoria to be a fortune teller, tarot card reader or witch.

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Via reddit.com

Victorian Attorney-General Rob Hulls introduced legislation repealing the Vagrancy Act, saying many of the offences had no place in a multicultural and tolerant society.“It is almost 200 years old and is steeped in the language and attitudes of Dickensian England.” Source: The Age.

14. You Could Set Off A Bomb In Australia And No One Would Notice (and the Aum Shinrikyo cult did. Possibly!)

You Could Set Off A Bomb In Australia And No One Would Notice (and the Aum Shinrikyo cult did. Possibly! )

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Via thedailysheeple.com

Australia is a country “so vast and empty that a band of amateur enthusiasts could conceivably set off the world’s first non-governmental atomic bomb on its mainland and almost four years would pass before anyone noticed”. Source: Down Under by Bill Bryson.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/simoncrerar/14-little-known-nuggets-of-australian-history

The post 14 Little Known Nuggets Of Australian History appeared first on How To Buy Franchises.

7 Things We Can’t Wait To See When “The Comeback” Returns

I DO wanna see that!

Before the rise of the Kardashians or any housewife, there was a star named Valerie Cherish (Lisa Kudrow), the leading lady of HBO’s The Comeback. The fortysomething D-list actress who found success decades earlier just wanted to get cast on a sitcom with four characters half her age and in the process, she agreed to document her return to the screen on a reality show (also called The Comeback).

Despite being put in a tracksuit and a cupcake costume, dealing with a writer who hates her, and constantly asking and being denied requests to turn off the cameras, Val kept the smile on her face and the bounce in her curls throughout the show’s first season, which aired in 2005. But by the end of its initial run, there was good news and bad news: Val had punched her writer in the gut, leading both of them to throw up on national television, and had her reality show renewed for a second season.

Nearly a decade later, fans are finally going to get a glimpse into what that second season consisted of and what Hollywood’s “It” girl has been up to after all this time now that HBO’s revived The Comeback, with new episodes set to debut in November.

With Kudrow and co-creator Michael Patrick King already deep into the long-awaited return, here are a few things we can look forward to in The Comeback’s comeback.

1. Val’s inability to understand the camera

HBO via bricesander.tumblr.com

HBO via bricesander.tumblr.com

 

HBO via bricesander.tumblr.com

HBO via bricesander.tumblr.com

 

Val’s inability to understand that the camera never stops rolling only got funnier with each episode. From saying, “I won’t say, ‘I thought I’d never work again’” (failing to recognize that her words could be twisted with editing), to admitting to trying cocaine, to believing saying “cut” would make any subsequent words unusable, Val’s wonderful naivety was always on full display. Though reality television has changed drastically over the last decade, we wouldn’t be surprised if Val – particularly since she and Marky Mark (Damian Young) are producing now – stayed the same. And while King said at The Comeback’s panel at the 2014 Television Critics Association press tour, “Reality TV is not where we land. It is where Valerie starts trying to land, and then she goes someplace else when she gets cast in a show on HBO,” hopefully there’s still film rolling above her bed and on her bathroom vanity.

2. The original cast

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HBO / Via blaykesbigbite.tumblr.com

Over the last nine years, many stars of The Comeback have found success: Kellan Lutz (Chris MacNess) played Emmett Cullen in the Twilight franchise; Vanessa Marano (Franchesca Berman) stars in the ABC Family hit Switched at Birth; and Malin Akerman (Babygirl aka Juna Millken) has acted beside Sandra Bullock, Ben Stiller, and Vince Vaughn (to name a few) and starred on her own series, Trophy Wife. Unfortunately, Marano’s rep confirmed to BuzzFeed that Val’s outrageous stepdaughter won’t be in the series due to scheduling conflicts, but, during the TCA panel, King said Lutz and Akerman will indeed be back, as well as Lance Barber (Paulie G), who has some “unfinished business” to settle, Kudrow added.

3. Especially Mickey

HBO via crazyforsimgm.tumblr.com

HBO via crazyforsimgm.tumblr.com

 

HBO via crazyforsimgm.tumblr.com

HBO via crazyforsimgm.tumblr.com

 

HBO via crazyforsimgm.tumblr.com

HBO via crazyforsimgm.tumblr.com

 

Val’s flamboyant, overly obedient hairdresser/biggest fan, Mickey (Robert Michael Morris), is perhaps the most under-appreciated character from Season 1. In the finale, Mickey is finally given his own storyline, when he brings his boyfriend (who he has kept hidden for years) to Val’s screening party. Now that he’s back, we’ll hopefully get a look at Mickey that doesn’t involve him holding Val’s handbag.

4. Val in a more serious role

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HBO / Via blaykesbigbite.tumblr.com

Everyone loved Aunt Sassy, Val’s character on the sitcom Room and Bored, but it would be great to see her act in a different setting. Luckily, when the series returns, Val will be working on an HBO dramedy, so the chances of seeing another side to her are very high. “How we sort of depicted a sitcom, a network sitcom that wasn’t doing well, we’ll do our very best to reflect Valerie’s experience if she got lucky enough to be cast on an HBO dramedy, which, through plot twists (which I won’t get into here now), hopefully you’ll believe,” King said at TCA.

5. Val, uncensored

HBO via louisdreyfus.tumblr.com

HBO via louisdreyfus.tumblr.com

 

Arguably the best moment of The Comeback is when Val punches Paulie G in a giant cupcake suit. (Her rendition of “I Will Survive” is a close second.) In the moments where Val forgets about the cameras and asks on instinct, her true star quality shines brightest. And according to King, viewers will see a lot more of that. “Nine years ago, she was hyper-aware of the camera, and in this series, she gets a little bit more used to the camera and, just like you see those reality shows, people actually start to behave sort of like themselves in moments,” he said.

6. Some big guest stars

%image_alt% Sean Hayes @theseanhayes

Had a fun time the other day on the set of #TheComeback with #LisaKudrow. Expect a little cameo from yours truly this season. <img src="https://s.w.org/images/core/emoji/2.2.1/72×72/1f642.png&quot; alt="

The Knicks Can’t Get Any Worse, But That’s Actually Good News For Fans

Last night, the Knicks lost their 14th straight game against the Houston Rockets. It is no joke the team is tanking, and everyone knows it as evident by this video: Announcers, fans, opponents and even the Knicks themselves all see the writing on the wall. The 2014-2015 season for the Knicks is

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The Knicks Can’t Get Any Worse, But That’s Actually Good News For Fans

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Last night, the Knicks lost their 14th straight game against the Houston Rockets.

It is no joke the team is tanking, and everyone knows it as evident by this video:

Announcers, fans, opponents and even the Knicks themselves all see the writing on the wall. The 2014-2015 season for the Knicks is a wash.

The 5-33 New York Knicks have the worst record in basketball; their star player is sidelined due to a knee injury, and they have a rookie coach who is trying his best to keep a straight face, stay positive and say all the right things:

This even led to cynical commentary by the TNT announcers as they sarcastically discussed the speech by Fisher. “You wonder how many times Derek Fisher has said that to his team,” Marv Albert said. “You usually hear that coming from college coaches.” responded Miller.

As a die-hard Knicks fan and basketball fan in general, I realize that a franchise must bottom out before it reaches the pinnacle of success.

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All the great dynasties have done it – the pre-Tim-Duncan Spurs, the pre-LeBron Cleveland Cavaliers, the pre-Kevin-Durant Seattle SuperSonics/OKC Thunder… the list goes on.

The Knicks are truly at the bottom and the laughing stock of the entire NBA, as evident by last night’s TNT commentary of the Knicks vs. Rockets game.

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The Knicks have always had a history of wanting to avoid going through a true rebuilding process, instead choosing to always go with a quick-fix solution to attempt to stay relevant, whether it was making a quick trade or overpaying for mid-level talent.

The Knicks have never had a losing season on purpose. But, for better or worse, we can finally say they are truly bad. Where does the franchise go from here?

TwitterTwitter

Twitter

When you are at the bottom, there is nowhere to go but up. The franchise will improve. Phil Jackson is doing the things that GMs of years past have refused to do.

He is completely gutting the team and rebuilding through a potential top five draft pick and cap space.

The idea of the Knicks having a top five pick sounds mythical because the franchise has a history of trading its picks, or never being bad enough to land a top five draft pick. This is a great start.

Fans must also realize Phil is not just focused on this coming offseason, but also on the long haul. In the summer of 2016, Kevin Durant will be a free agent, and with the open cap space the Knicks currently have and will have in 2016… well, a Knicks fan can dream, right?

But, the fact that the team will have flexibility to make moves shows why the team can only improve from here. I know being a Knicks fan is tough, but let everyone get their laughs in while they can.

And, as if we needed more proof, the fact that ESPN removed Knicks games from their national television schedule nails the coffin closed. But, Knicks fans need to have faith and trust in Phil because things will get better.

Rome wasn’t built in a day. The Knicks’ day will come.

Read more: http://elitedaily.com/sports/knicks-hit-rock-bottom-means-can-go/902227/

The post The Knicks Can’t Get Any Worse, But That’s Actually Good News For Fans appeared first on How To Buy Franchises.

LINCOMPOOPS: The Knicks Have Not Been Completely Honest About Jeremy Lin’s Injury

View this image ” RAY STUBBLEBINE / Reuters The New York Daily News reported today that the Knicks might have delayed a few days in telling the world that Jeremy Lin’s torn meniscus would likely sideline him for the year. Here’s the narrative being put forward: the Knicks hid the injury to

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